Paraphernalia of a Life

1,885 notes

If you’re a student in one of the black schools here and you get into a fight you’ll probably get arrested and charged with assault. We have kids here who are barred from voting before they’re even old enough to register.

A black (male) protestor/resident of Ferguson, as quoted in Newsweek. 

Here is where the “talking-head”/op-ed bent of our media and culture has failed us. While they all want to bemoan the “12% voter turnout at the last election,” no one has the sense to ask about the structural forces that contribute to that low figure. Instead they (and I’m including Al Sharpton in this category) yell at black voters to do their part, or, when they’re being nice about it, try to get protestors to register to vote. But listen to those protestors who cannot vote. They’re telling us they never stood a chance.

(via madrassoup)

(via scifi-fantasist)

Filed under voting rights ferguson white supremacy

1,252 notes

fuckyeahsouthasia:

Two 15-year-old school boys have developed a device that will enable a shoe to charge a mobile phone while walking. Anand Gangadharan and Mohak Bhalla, both students of south Delhi’s Mount Carmel school, have invented a compact attachment, which, when attached to the heel of the shoe, will automatically act as a portable mobile charger.Named ‘Walkie Mobi Charger’, this gadget generates electricity up to six volts, as against five volts released through a plug point and ensures that the phone battery is charged at a faster pace. So if a plug-in charger takes half-an-hour to charge a phones up to 25%, the walking device will charge 40% of the battery in the same time………..The device functions on the principle of electromagnetic induction. The compression and relaxation caused by walking creates pressure on the sponge attached in the middle which produces electricity.Two LEDs, blue and red, indicate the supply of electricity and battery charging, respectively.The device is equipped to charge several models of phones. All one needs to do is connect the charger to the shoe while the phone rests in your pocket. “This is an effective way to utilise an alternate source of energy and is also a healthy way to decrease your electricity bills,” they said.

fuckyeahsouthasia:

Two 15-year-old school boys have developed a device that will enable a shoe to charge a mobile phone while walking. Anand Gangadharan and Mohak Bhalla, both students of south Delhi’s Mount Carmel school, have invented a compact attachment, which, when attached to the heel of the shoe, will automatically act as a portable mobile charger.
Named ‘Walkie Mobi Charger’, this gadget generates electricity up to six volts, as against five volts released through a plug point and ensures that the phone battery is charged at a faster pace. So if a plug-in charger takes half-an-hour to charge a phones up to 25%, the walking device will charge 40% of the battery in the same time………..
The device functions on the principle of electromagnetic induction. The compression and relaxation caused by walking creates pressure on the sponge attached in the middle which produces electricity.Two LEDs, blue and red, indicate the supply of electricity and battery charging, respectively.The device is equipped to charge several models of phones. All one needs to do is connect the charger to the shoe while the phone rests in your pocket. “This is an effective way to utilise an alternate source of energy and is also a healthy way to decrease your electricity bills,” they said.

(via oh-snap-pro-choice)

Filed under india anand gangadharan mokak bhalla inventors amazing kids

6,685 notes

Unfortunately, the people who are supposed to love us aren’t always able to give us the kind of love we need. Whether they are our mothers or our fathers, our grandparents or our siblings, some family, no matter how good their intentions, leave us feeling empty, invalidated, uncared for, and alone. And on the days when that pain becomes too much to bear, our work is to recognize that those people whose love we so desperately pine for are never going to be able to meet our needs. Not because they don’t care, but because they can’t change who they are.

Their scant affection isn’t a reflection on our worth. It isn’t even about us. It’s about them and their own limitations and struggles. It’s about their unique way of expressing love and the fact that it doesn’t match up with our own. And we don’t have to internalize that. What we need is to start reaching out to the right people. We need to create a family of people outside of our family. People who can meet our needs and reciprocate our love.

We need to appreciate our families for the ways in which they are able to show they care, and be accepting of the ways they can’t. We need to make peace with who they are and if necessary, we need to give ourselves permission to let go. We need to know that our worth isn’t something another person’s love can give or take away. We need to trust that with or without their affection, we are enough.

Daniell Koepke   (via junecoast)

(Source: internal-acceptance-movement, via iamacollectionofmiscellanyandtea)

Filed under quote self therapy family relationships q

51,317 notes

peopleofthediaspora:

braiker:

bethrevis:

US Constitution, First Amendment: The right to assemble, to have free speech, to have freedom of the press.

Ferguson Police: Kicks out media and limits protestors to a “First Amendment Area”image

funny, i thought the WHOLE COUNTRY was a first amendment area. silly me. 

Wow. They are going to have so many lawsuits when all is said and done.

(via queergiftedblack)

3,167 notes

sidleyparkhermit:

For those who are interested, here’s the firsthand account from the Amnesty observers’ team, who are still in Ferguson, of what they experienced last night. You can also find some of the personal Twitters of the team members on that page.
If you’re just catching up, this is Amnesty USA’s press release from when they first dispatched observers (their own link is broken) and a more personal blog post from a member of the delegation.

sidleyparkhermit:

For those who are interested, here’s the firsthand account from the Amnesty observers’ team, who are still in Ferguson, of what they experienced last night. You can also find some of the personal Twitters of the team members on that page.

If you’re just catching up, this is Amnesty USA’s press release from when they first dispatched observers (their own link is broken) and a more personal blog post from a member of the delegation.

(via cultureisnotacostume)

Filed under ferguson

178 notes

bi-and-super-fly asked: I know of a lot of bi people, myself included, who realized that they weren't straight at a very young age, and then "forgot" for several years until it was made apparent in the future. Do you have any opinion on why this happens?

a-little-bi-furious:

totally-toasty:

a-little-bi-furious:

Heteronormativity with monosexism thrown in for good measure.

Practically as soon as we escape the womb we’re told being straight is what we are and being anything else is an anomaly, which is why the coming out process is difficult as hell.

The closet is different for everyone and there’s more than a few gay people who do the same “forgetting” aka avoiding realising their true sexuality simply because the pressure is too much and there simply don’t know how to process it and don’t want to deal with the rampant homophobia that would result. I mean it’s so much easier to forget than it is to live with not being straight.

There’s also this idea that realising you’re not straight is this monumental “I always knew” and “thinking of banging and having babies” sort of deal, when in fact much like straight attraction it’s just not as big a deal early on and not at all sexualised like it is in most media, so it’s often brushed off as inconclusive or nothing out of the ordinary. The Ellen episode where she came out summed it up pretty well for me, which I will paraphrase: “my first crush was on the ice cream vendor at the ice rink, I just thought it was because she gave me extra sprinkles”.

When you get older you start to realise a lot of moments like that that were forgotten but suddenly come back to mind with a new perspective.

Bi people have this double bind of homophobia and biphobia, so they might be extra motivated to “forget” because there are less visable resources and essentially no narratives on how to discover you’re bi (none that are not kinda fucked up that is) and they interpret their attraction as being a fleeting innocent thing or what they are for life. For example, some bisexuals I’ve met would say that they were straight when in boy/girl relationships and gay when in same-gender relationships, they just wouldn’t even explore the idea they could be bi because they had no idea there was a catagory and they were currently in a relationship with someone of this particular gender so case closed right? Hell, how can they think it’s an idea worth exploring when they don’t even think it exists?

The idea that bisexuality is “a phase” also plays a big part in this phenomena, I think whether we know it or not we all internalise this pervasive idea that you need to prove your bisexuality is true by either having lots of sex with many genders or by knowing 100% that you are bisexual with some kind of divine proof sent from bi god or something. So even when you know very young, you don’t think you “know” know, so it gets put in the back of your mind until it resurfaces in a big way in your life. Some bisexuals don’t reach that stage until they are 50 or older, it’s kind of incredible how that can happen and sadly not uncommon.

wow, i thought i was the only one. I knew I was bi when i was about 17, but i spent ten years waiting to grow out of it. Any girls i crushed on were just anomalies, as far as i was concerned, then when i hit 27 i was like ‘okay maybe it isn’t a phase after all’ lol. In between i sort of forgot about it, spending most of that time in different-gender relationships. Mind you, my own gender confuses things there, it took me until i was about 27 to realise that my gender and sexuality were two different things… and then that i was bisexual and bigender as well. confusing much, and i seem to have written an entire paragraph on someone elses post sorry

No it’s totally okay and welcome :) I love people sharing stuff like this on my posts because then I can boost them and let people know they are not alone.

Filed under mogai bisexuality lgbt

5,039 notes

SD Police Say Tazing 8-Year-Old Native Girl Was Justified, Family Sues

gravediggs:

The Chief of Police justifies the use of a tazer on an 8 year old girl by saying they could have used their guns or batons, essentially. What restraint.

(via nitanahkohe)

Filed under south dakota racism abuse tw child abuse tw police brutality

28,588 notes

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

(via comfemgem)

Filed under signal boost